logo
the architecture observer
   
Read    Buy    Contact

 

37

Misplaced architecture is a guide to modern architecture in Amsterdam that does not observe the unwritten rule of respectful modesty that is expected in the inner city area. The selected projects, dating from the late 1950s to the early 1980s, offer a glimpse of an alternative reading of the Dutch capital, as something other than the neat, untoucha ...

 

38

One of the slogans of this year's Lisbon Architecture Triennale, titled Close, Closer, is: 'The old, the ossified, must always give way to new life and the birth of new things'. (Most people would probably associate birth and new life with something more lively than those inanimate 'new things' of Beatrice Galilee and her team.) There is something ...

 

39

While most people use Twitter to share their often cringe-making daily-life triumphs with the rest of the world, Rem Koolhaas is a rather taciturn user of the service, with no more than twelve tweets in five years. He nevertheless boasts an impressive number of almost 50,000 followers, apparently eager to receive the next sliver of wisdom from Kool ...

 

40

One of the reasons I like being an architectural critic is that it enables me to postpone my opinion. I see, hear or read something, and sleep on it before I have to formulate what I think of it. I always admire people who are instantly opinionated, but I fear that, like instant coffee, those opinions are often very soluble. This crossed my mind ...

 

41

What makes the cities of the former Socialist countries of Central Europe so attractive? For me it is that they reflect two kinds of optimism. On the one hand, there is the optimism of the efforts and achievements of recent generations to bring about change. Nearly 25 years after the transition process began in Central and Eastern Europe, many new ...

 

42

While a building can usually take care of itself, the culture of architecture needs a conversation. In theory the digital age is paradisiacal for conversations: everybody has access to a variety of media to articulate an opinion. This has certainly many upsides. Architecture’s discourse is, at least in theory, more inclusive than ever before. Anyon ...